Northamptonshire Flag

 COUNTY FLAG OF NORTHAMPTONSHIRE (2)

The flag of Northamptonshire was the winning entry in a competition held in 2014 by the local county council, in conjunction with the Flag Institute, to select a flag for the county. The winning design was unveiled at a ceremony held at County Hall in Northampton, on September 11th 2014 and duly registered by the Flag Institute.

 FLAG RAISING (2)The ceremony was attended by a selection of local dignitaries

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including the Lord Lieutenant David Laing, seen here 

FLAG RAISING (2)

FLAG RAISING (2)

raising the new county flag.

This winning design was deemed to be a joint submission by two separate entrants, Brady Ells, seen here with his winning design

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and Ian Chadwick

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who had independently contrived designs that were so similar, that the judging panel declared them to be a joint submission. Information on the background of the flag was presented at the unveiling ceremony

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The genesis of the design submitted by Brady Ells had appeared several years previously

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a creation which he amended for the competition with the addition of a black fimbriation and a more detailed rose, in the Tudor style.

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A red rose is a long recognised and ubiquitous county emblem, indeed the county’s soubriquet is “The Rose of the Shires”. This link with the red rose emblem extends back to at least 1665, when, heraldic historian C.W Scott-Giles reports, it appeared on a seal used by the county magistrates in Quarter Sessions, although no illustration of this device appears to be available. The emblem recalls an historic association with the house of Lancaster: Elizabeth Woodville, wife of Lancastrian King Edward IV (reigned 1461– 1483) and ancestor of every English monarch since Henry VIII and every Scottish monarch since James V, was born at Grafton Regis in the county.

A great many organisations in the county, especially sporting bodies, consequently feature a rose in their insignia, including; the county police service, both as a traditional badge

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and in modern logo stylePOLICE LOGO (2)

and Northamptonshire Fire & Rescue Service groupINSERT IMAGE 10 NORTHANTS FIRE (2)A rose is also used by, from left to right below, Northamptonshire Football Association; Northamptonshire Women’s and Girls Football League and Northamptonshire Combination Football League

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Northamptonshire County Cricket Club has had two versions of a club badge featuring the rose; the former version, a resplendent gold, against a maroon background, at left below and the current one at right, notably dark red or maroon in colour with gold detailing

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Three golfing institutions in the county have a rose for their badge; from left to right, below, Northamptonshire Golf Union, Northamptonshire Ladies County Golf Association and Northamptonshire County Golf Club

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Other sports associations that use the rose as a logo include from left to right below, Northamptonshire Table Tennis Association; Northamptonshire Amateur Swimming Association; Northamptonshire Hockey; Northamptonshire County Archery Society and Northamptonshire Bowling Association.

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The rose also appears in the club badges of two professional sports teams in the county; Northampton Town Football Club, at the base of the badge

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and Northampton Saints rugby club, in the centre of the badge.

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And the badge of the Northamptonshire Federation Of Women’s Institutes includes a roseROSY BADGES 7 (2)It may be noted that every one of these rose depictions has an upwards pointing central sepal at the top, so this seems to be something of a standard form. However, before its official grant of arms in 1939, Northamptonshire County Council also used a rose as its seal

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where curiously, the central sepal points straight down! Having appeared on the seal, the rose duly appeared as the prime charge on the council’s officially awarded coat of arms, granted in 1939,COUNCIL ARMS (2)where the central sepal is unequivocally oriented straight up.

And in the modern era, the council additionally uses a rose themed logo in various realisationsCOUNCIL LOGO (2)The rose that appears on the council’s arms is clearly a definite red, symbolising the aforementioned link with the House of Lancaster, while two smaller white roses in the chief (at the top) recall linkage with the House of York. However, in several of the above modern examples, the rose depicted is actually a Tudor Rose, a symbol which famously combined the floral symbols of these opposing factions in the internecine 15th century conflicts. Use of a Tudor rose therefore rather fails to signify the specific Lancastrian association that the red rose is intended to convey! This usage may have arisen simply because of its general national ubiquity – although it is certainly formed from the combination of a red flower with a white one, upon first gaze, it is still an essentially red rose and being the most obvious example of such a device, was likely duly utilised in the above instances through natural familiarity and common usage.

The competition’s judging panel however, decided to ensure that the county would have a unique rose to avoid misidentification with the rose emblems of other counties. Consequently a distinct Northamptonshire rose was created, by combining elements appearing in the various roses that have been used to represent the county, including; the cinquefoil shape from the centre of the council logo; the maroon or dark red colour of the county cricket club rose; the gold inner petals of the Northamptonshire Golf Union rose, the upwards orientation of the central sepal and the inclusion of two tiers of petals. The resultant charge, the unique and attractive “Northamptonshire rose”,INSERT IMAGE 21 NORTHAMPTONSHIRE ROSE (2)replaced the originally submitted depiction.

This new splendid Northamptonshire rose thus sits at the centre of a broad, edged cross, a form that has proven popular with many recently conceived English county flags, which recalls the national cross of Saint George. The broad dimensions of the cross allow the rose to stand out well and as with the flag of Nottinghamshire, the cross shape represents the position of the county as a crossroads at the centre of England. The dark red and gold hues used to form the rose are repeated in the gold colour of the cross and the dark red or maroon background against which it is placed. These are the club colours of Northamptonshire County Cricket ClubNORTHAMPTONSHIRE SHIRTS 1 (2)

Northamptonshire County Bowling Association

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Northamptonshire Basketball Club

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Northamptonshire Golf Union

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and Northampton Town Football Club;

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Evidently the definitive sporting colours of the county, this combination of dark red ( maroon) and gold is emblematic of the county generally and was the obvious scheme to assign to the county flag.

The gold cross is edged in black, recalling the county’s leather boot and shoe industry, the importance of which is demonstrated by the leather hides appearing on the logo of Northamptonshire County Table Tennis Association, at left below and the Coat of Arms of Kettering Borough Council, at right.

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Northampton Town Football club is also nicknamed “The Cobblers” in honour of this local industry.

The maroon hue and rose had also featured amongst the other finalists in the competition.

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Following its registration Northamptonshire’s flag has been raised across the county,

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embraced by local civic dignitaries

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and was much in evidence on the inaugural Northamptonshire Day, October 25th 2015.

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While the Northamptonshire County Council’s armorial banner

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is available commercially it represents only that body and only the council may legally use it; it is not the county flag. Additionally, the following design is also marketed as a Northamptonshire flag,

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An inelegant fabrication combining the cross of Saint George with the supporters and motto from the full achievement of the council arms and oddly, a Tudor rose rather than that found on the council’s arms, this is also, most definitely, not the county flag of Northamptonshire.

Northamptonshire

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